Diversity in Science at the British Antarctic Survey

In 1985, scientists at the British Antarctic Survey reported the discovery of a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica. They had been monitoring ozone levels at the Halley Research Station since 1957, and this study paved the way for the 1989 Montreal Protocol to stop the use of polluting chlorofluorocarbons – arguably the most … More Diversity in Science at the British Antarctic Survey

The Water Story of the Quelccaya Ice Cap

Glaciers are vital water resources for hundreds of millions of people worldwide. In some regions, meltwater from ice can be the primary source of drinking water in dry seasons or times of exceptional drought. The rapid global decline of mountain glaciers therefore poses a serious threat to water resource management across the world. 99% of … More The Water Story of the Quelccaya Ice Cap

Looking at the Earth in 3D with Stereo Imagery

The Earth is not flat, yet our visualisations of Earth are frequently from a 2-dimensional perspective. Whether that’s from Google Maps, or the most advanced optical satellites, our data is flat. But, a remote sensing technique using stereo imagery allows us to derive 3D models of landscapes from 2D still images. Stereo Imagery When satellites … More Looking at the Earth in 3D with Stereo Imagery

Dating Peat

Peatlands are perfect archives of past environmental change. It takes a very long time for peat to accumulate – on the order of 1 mm per year for temperate regions, but as low as 0.1 mm per year in the Arctic. The high water table of wetlands means that organic matter takes much longer to decompose … More Dating Peat

What’s new in the Quaternary? – QRA 2018 Conference

This week I was delighted to join the Quaternary Research Association’s 2018 conference with my fellow Masters by Research accomplice, Vicky Naylor. We had a fantastic time and in this blog post I’ll share some of my highlights from the conference. It’s an exciting time in Quaternary research and this was echoed in the theme … More What’s new in the Quaternary? – QRA 2018 Conference

6 reasons to learn about Climate Change with the University of Exeter

On January 22nd 2018, the University of Exeter are releasing a brand new course that explores the science, impacts and evidence of climate change. Here are 6 reasons why you should sign-up! 1) Solve the Weather v Climate myths You may have seen this tweet from the President of the United States recently: In the … More 6 reasons to learn about Climate Change with the University of Exeter